Obedience and behavioral modification flowchart

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Behavioral Issues

Is your dog practicing a dangerous or destructive behavior?
Yes.
Option one: Prevent the dog from practicing the behavior.


Option two: You can use corrections immediately to stop dangerous or destructive behaviors. For example, if your dog digs, then you can correct that behavior out of your dog's repertoire, but you have to be sure to correct your dog when they are digging, not hours after the hole has been dug.

Is the behavior based on fear?
Yes.
You want to implement counter conditioning and desensitization.

You can learn about that here.

Is the behavior based on aggression?
Yes.
Aggression is a very complicated issue, so I made a video dedicated to that subject. 

Is it a behavior you just don’t want the dog to perform, such as jumping on furniture or going into an unauthorized room, such as a baby’s room? 
Yes.
Does the dog know his continuation and terminal markers? 

No. 
Watch these videos: 
1) Video one 
2) Video two 

 

Yes.
Does the dog know and understand how to follow a lure?
No. 
Watch these videos: 
1) Video one 
2) Video two 
3) Video three 


Yes.
Does your dog know and understand leash pressure? 
No. 
Watch these videos: 
1) Video one 
2) Video two 


Yes.
Has the dog been taught that the behavior is not okay with leash pressure?
No. 
Here are three different video examples teaching dogs to not perform specific behaviors with leash pressure. You’ll see the process is the same for each example: 
1) Video one 
2) Video two 
3) Video three 


Yes.
Option one: Continuing using leash pressure to prevent the dog from practicing the behavior or prevent the possibility of the dog practicing the behavior.


Option two: You can use corrections to stop these behaviors. For example, if your dog jumps on the sofa, the moment they jump on the couch, you will say "no," and then you will correct your dog with the training-collar. After the correction, you will give the command you want your dog to perform, such as “off”. If your dog still doesn't perform the behavior, you will then use leash-pressure to remove the dog from the couch. 

Obedience Issues

Is your dog refusing to perform a commanded behavior?
Yes.
Does the dog know his continuation and terminal markers? 
No. 
Watch these videos: 
1) Video one 

2) Video two


Yes.
Does the dog know and understand how to follow a lure?
No. 
Watch these videos: 

1) Video one 

2) Video two 

3) Video three 


Yes.

Does your dog know and understand leash pressure? 

No. 

Watch these videos: 

1) Video one 

2) Video two 


Yes.
Have you taught the verbal command by saying the command first and then presenting the physical cue? Meaning, your dog will perform the behavior on the verbal command alone, and you no longer have to assist with the physical cue.
No. 
Watch these videos:
1) Video one 
2) Video two 


Yes.
Option one: When the dog chooses not to perform the command, within the first second, say “wrong,” then use the leash pressure to make the dog comply. 


Option two: If you give your dog a command, and they choose not to perform that command, the moment they decide they aren't going to execute the command, you will say "no," and then you will correct your dog with the training-collar. After the correction, you will give the command to your dog again. If your dog still doesn't perform the behavior, you will then use leash-pressure or luring to place your dog into that position. 


Does your dog refuse to stay in a commanded stay?
Yes.
Does the dog know his continuation and terminal markers? 
No. 
Watch these videos: 
1) Video one 

2) Video two

Yes.
Does the dog know and understand how to follow a lure?
No. 
Watch these videos: 

1) Video one 

2) Video two 

3) Video three

Yes.

Does your dog know and understand leash pressure? 

No. 

Watch these videos: 

1) Video one 

2) Video two 


Yes.
Have you taught the verbal command for the position the dog is in, (such as a sit-stay, the dog must know the sit command on verbal) by saying the command first and then presenting the physical cue? Meaning, your dog will perform the behavior on the verbal command alone, and you no longer have to assist with the physical cue.
No. 
Watch these videos:
1) Video one 
2) Video two 


Yes.
Has the dog been taught that breaking the stay is not allowed with leash pressure?
No.
Watch these videos:
1) Video one 
2) Video two 


Yes.
If your dog breaks the stay and you say “wrong,” does your dog freeze in place or go back to the previous position. 


Yes.
Option one: When your dog breaks that position, you will calmly say “wrong,” casually walk to your dog, grab the leash and use the leash-pressure to place your dog back into the position that was just broken. Once your dog is back in the desired position you will praise and pet your dog (petting is optional), but don’t give your dog a treat or toy reward. The reason for this, is that some dogs will break the position on purpose, so they can get the reward when placed back into the stay position.

Option two: When your dog breaks a position, you will say "no," but instead of using leash-pressure, you will give your dog a correction with the training-collar (even if your dog goes back into the position on their own). After you give the physical correction, you will then command your dog back into the position that was just broken. If your dog fails to do it on their own after the correction, you will assist them with the leash pressure or luring. You don’t want to continue to correct a dog for the same mistake over and over again. Once your dog is back in the desired position you will praise and pet your dog (petting is optional), but don’t give your dog a treat or toy reward. The reason for this, is that some dogs will break the position on purpose, so they can get the reward when placed back into the stay position.